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Photo #2505: Pyrgus serratulae

Imago

Pyrgus serratulae

Base gallery. Lateral/Underside. Alive insect.

Photo: Andrey Sazykin. Image redone at the website. Identified by: Sergei Kotov. Uncertain taxon

Place of shooting/catching: Возможно Пермская обл.

Comments on this image

25.10.2013 18:30, Alexandr Zhakov

Sergey, our aim is not just move from not identified to confidently identified but do it right. :) And I'll stand for this position. Let's hide emotions which impede the business. I'll give a reply now on Agonopterix on its page.

25.10.2013 18:27, Alexandr Zhakov Corrected data.

Pyrgus malvae / Confidently identified Pyrgus serratulae / Tentatively identified.

25.10.2013 17:59, Sergei Kotov

Alexander, I believe that the ill-defined Pyrgus serratulae still can move.
After all, you yourself wrote that the ill-defined transferred those instances, the cord is difficult to make a choice between several similar species. My opinion - this is the case.Do not marinate the same photo in this uncertain until the end of time ??? All the more so the case is not the most difficult (and sometimes worse - when it is not clear that even for the family).

And please give me the answer here http://lepidoptera.ru/gallery/24197, what are the kinds of Agonopterix which can be easily confused with views Agonopterix arenella and who live in the central part of Russia? Just wondering.

25.10.2013 17:36, Alexandr Zhakov

There are no flight periods noticed, the rest is only your imagination as well as the location. And Sergey please less nervous, I think we've here for the same purpose to make this site better, so let's make it such :)

25.10.2013 17:16, Sergei Kotov

Here, IMHO, it is much easier than it sounds. The author of this butterfly was originally identified as a Carterocephalus palaemon. Period summer C. palaemon Perm - mid-May - early June. At the same time palaemon of pirgusov only fly Pyrgus serratulae. Alveus departs later - from mid-June.
So, IMHO, in the photo - Pyrgus serratulae

25.10.2013 16:53, Alexandr Zhakov

Yes, I opt for a small Permi: or Pyrgus serratulae, or Pyrgus alveus. It does not know about the local timing of the summer and spread of these species.

25.10.2013 14:59, Sergei Kotov

The vast majority of the photos that the author of the Perm region. This, I think, is also there. And yes, if a variant with malvae fails, it can be (given the fact that this photo was taken during the summer Carterocephalus palaemon) option with Pyrgus serratulae fit?

25.10.2013 14:58, Peter Khramov

Ie This is not Palemon And not mallow, helmet in uncertainty?

25.10.2013 14:55, Sergei Kotov

I wish I did not touch it at all :(

25.10.2013 14:45, Alexandr Zhakov

Petr, Sergey Kotov evidently too hurried as he apparently has a wishful thinking. This is indeed Pyrgus but I can't agree with the very species, definitely not malvae. Also no location where the moth was shot, can't be even tentatively identified.

25.10.2013 14:29, Peter Khramov Corrected data.

Carterocephalus palaemon / Andrey Sazykin Pyrgus malvae / Sergei Kotov.

25.10.2013 10:43, Sergei Kotov

No!!! It is not Carterocephalus palaemon. It Pyrgus malvae (Linnaeus, 1758) !!!

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